Woman uses belly dancing to overcome trauma of nightclub shootout

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Woman shot dead in horrific nightclub raid reveals how belly dancing helped her heal from traumatic assault.

Nurjahan Bolden, 36, from Los Angeles, Calif. I was in Toronto, Canada When she got married in July 2006, she and her friends decided to go to Volume Nightclub. She was on the roof terrace when the criminal shot.

The dancer, who was 21 at the time, was shot in the shin and his lower limbs were shattered. She was lying on the ground next to a man killed in a gang-related shootout while awaiting the arrival of paramedics.

Overcome trauma: Nurjahan Boulden, 36, of Los Angeles, Calif., Turned to belly dancing to heal her physically and mentally ten years after she was shot in the foot.

Horrific: A dancer, then 21, was shot in the shin and shattered his lower limbs.  When a shooter shoots a nightclub volume in Toronto, Canada.

Horrific: A dancer, then 21, was shot in the shin and shattered his lower limbs.

“Suddenly I felt a vibration in my leg. There was no warning that something bad was going to happen. She said, “I fell face down on the concrete and heard the balls splash. Is hot.” I was touched, I was touched. “My whole lower body was numb. ”

When the bullet stopped flying, I was lying on concrete, and there was a man three feet away from me, who was bleeding. He was shot twice in the chest and once in the head.

“For 30 minutes, I lay down watching him bleed. When paramedics arrived, they put a tarp over him and saw that he was not on time.

Nurjahan was taken to St. Michael’s Hospital and the doctor told her that she was glad to be alive because the bullet did not reach the artery.

Police could not find the culprit who killed one person that night and injured Nurjahan and another party attendee.

A week later, she returned to the United States and, contrary to the doctor’s advice, immediately returned to college.

Retrospective: Nurjahan and her friend (pictured during the filming party) went to a nightclub for a wedding in Toronto in July 2006.

Retrospective: Nurjahan and her friend (pictured during the filming party) went to a nightclub for a wedding in Toronto in July 2006.

Loss: She lay for 30 minutes next to a man who was shot in the head and was bleeding while waiting for an ambulance to arrive.  The man did not survive

Loss: She lay for 30 minutes next to a man who was shot in the head and was bleeding while waiting for an ambulance to arrive. The man did not survive

“I just pretended everything was fine. My legs broke and I was in fourth grade in a wheelchair, ”she recalls. “I did not receive good medical care, so I did not have boots or physiotherapy.”

Nurjahan had been dancing since he was able to walk, but he felt so painful that he didn’t dance for 10 years after the shooting.

Instead of pursuing her dream of becoming a dancer, she became a teacher after graduating from college. She met her husband, Charles (43), the principal of the school, and had three children: Bo (11), Zaime (8) and Hezekiah (5).

“During that time, I had panic attacks and flashbacks,” she said. “I could only think of the dying man next door. I have lived my life and that of my children. I was still scared.

“I bought a ladder for everyone on the second floor of the office building in case a mugger comes. I was scared to take my kids to school after the Sandy Hook shooting. ..

As he celebrated his 30th birthday in Mexico, Nurjahan once again experienced a traumatic throwback.

Trying to move forward: Nurjahan (taken to hospital after shooting) flies to the United States a week later and, contrary to medical advice, immediately returns to college.

Trying to move on: Nurjahan (taken to hospital after shooting) returned to the US a week later and, contrary to medical advice, immediately returned to college.

Bulky: Nurjahan gave up his dream of becoming a dancer and became a teacher instead.  She has suffered from panic attacks and flashbacks for 10 years.

Bulky: Nurjahan gave up his dream of becoming a dancer and became a teacher instead. She has suffered from panic attacks and flashbacks for 10 years.

“When we went to the bar, someone slapped the bar and I started to cry,” she said. “The car turned on me and I just started screaming and crying. “

In April 2016, Nurjahan attended the event and Ronda Foster shared how her seven-year-old son Evan was shot dead in the park.

“She was standing there and saying out loud her worst nightmare,” Nurjahan recalls. Then I went to see her and told her how important it was to hear her voice. I told her that she had been violent with guns.

“She was the first person to look at me and say, ‘You are a survivor.’ “

Ronda invited Nurjahan to speak about her experience the following month at an event organized by a women’s group against gun violence.

“I have decided to go through an intolerable process of writing my story,” Nurjahan said. A stranger in the hospital had to remove my tampon, my mother gave me a sponge bath after the shoot because I couldn’t wash myself, and the guilt towards the man next door. I was.

Life-changing: In April 2016, Nurjahan attended an event where Ronda Foster (pictured) spoke about her seven-year-old son, Evan, being shot dead in a park

Life-changing: In April 2016, Nurjahan attended an event where Ronda Foster (pictured) spoke about her seven-year-old son, Evan, being shot dead in a park

Unforgettable moment: Ronda was the first person to tell Nurjahan that she was a

Unforgettable moment: Ronda was the first person to tell Nurjahan that she was a “survivor”

Family: Nurjahan and her husband Charles, 43, the director has three children.  They are Bo (11), Zaime (8) and Hezekiah (5).

Family: Nurjahan and her husband Charles, 43, the director has three children. They are Bo (11), Zaime (8) and Hezekiah (5).

“When I got off the stage, 300 people stood up and applauded. I felt cheap, I was very embarrassed during the shoot.

While sharing her story, Nurjahan started to belly dance again.

“My legs never fully recovered,” she explained. “I had a lot of trouble with insurance and doctors. Finally, when I was 29, a CT scan showed my bones were still perforated.

“I put a stick and a screw in my leg, but I still couldn’t run. I realized that with mental distress comes physical distress. One of the biggest fears of dancing again is like before. It was because I didn’t know how to dance.

“So I decided to dance as ridiculously wild as possible on public roads to overcome this fear,” she continued. She was able to do it three times a week for six months. You can now play soccer and belly dancing. “

Belly dancing is often seen as a sexual performance, but Nurjahan explained that the dance form is linked to the mother’s education in Tanzania, East Africa.

Recovery: After having leg surgery at the age of 29, she overcame her fear of not being able to dance as before by roughly dancing the streets three times a week.

Recovery: After having leg surgery at the age of 29, she overcame her fear of not being able to dance as before by roughly dancing the streets three times a week.

Make a difference: Nurjahan danced in public for six months before running again and being able to belly dance.  She currently teaches oriental dance as a form of healing.

Make a difference: Nurjahan danced in public for six months before running again and being able to belly dance.

“I grew up in belly dancing ever since I learned to walk,” she says. “My mother’s family is from Tanzania and belly dancing is part of their culture.

It’s not about performance, it’s just with other women. In western media, belly dancing is sexual, but in my culture women come together in the community and celebrate each other.

Nurjahan currently teaches belly dancing as a form of healing, teaching students to dance naked in front of a mirror.

“I teach belly dancing as a way of healing and connecting with the body,” she said. Whether it’s gun violence or shame around your body, it helps heal the trauma you’ve been through.

“One of the challenges I throw at my students is to dance naked in front of the mirror and think only of the good things.

“Tell them to practice it every day until they really feel a good idea.”

Nurjahan hosts a clubhouse twice a month where victims of gun violence can share their experiences and get help.

LA Woman Uses Belly Dancing To Overcome Trauma From Nightclub Shooting Source Link LA Woman Uses Belly Dancing To Overcome Trauma From Nightclub Shooting


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