Oriental dance – Hands Of Kali http://handsofkali.com/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 19:05:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://handsofkali.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-6-150x150.png Oriental dance – Hands Of Kali http://handsofkali.com/ 32 32 Arab Celebrities and Fans Celebrate Lebanese Dance Group Mayyas’ Victory in “America’s Got Talent” https://handsofkali.com/arab-celebrities-and-fans-celebrate-lebanese-dance-group-mayyas-victory-in-americas-got-talent/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 08:03:29 +0000 https://handsofkali.com/arab-celebrities-and-fans-celebrate-lebanese-dance-group-mayyas-victory-in-americas-got-talent/ Meet Cédric Haddad: the stylist to the stars working with international luxury brands DUBAI: From the Valentino dress Raya Abirached wore to the BAFTA Awards in March to Balquees Fathi’s on-stage styling and Mona Zaki’s Cannes outfits, Dubai-based Lebanese designer Cedric Haddad has created stunning looks for some of the most famous names of the […]]]>

Meet Cédric Haddad: the stylist to the stars working with international luxury brands

DUBAI: From the Valentino dress Raya Abirached wore to the BAFTA Awards in March to Balquees Fathi’s on-stage styling and Mona Zaki’s Cannes outfits, Dubai-based Lebanese designer Cedric Haddad has created stunning looks for some of the most famous names of the Arab world.

His remarkable portfolio also includes styling for MBC shows such as “The Voice Kids” and “Arabs Got Talent”, conducting styling sessions for luxury brands such as Louis Vuitton and Valentino, and teaching at the FAD Institute. .

Haddad’s fascination with fashion began early – as a child he would often spend hours at the mall staring at models.

“It was like heaven for me,” he told Arab News. “You could just put me in the shops, and I’d be the happiest kid around.”

Styling was a hobby that turned into a full-time career for Haddad. Things really took off when he was asked to style TV presenter Hilda Khalife. “I say she’s my lucky charm – she opened everything up for me,” he says.

Haddad has become one of the few designers from the Middle East to be regulars at the Cannes Film Festival.

“Cannes is always magical and an experience in its own right,” he says. “Last time, I was selected by L’Oréal to dress their ambassadors, and I also dressed many celebrities for Chopard parties.”

Being backstage at Cannes may seem glamorous, but, says Haddad, “it’s not ‘La Vie en Rose’ at all. I always want to create something new while respecting the identity and personal style of the celebrity I’m working with. Finding that balance can be difficult.

And there is very little room for error. “The moment they get in the car, my heart starts beating. I have to make sure everything is fine – makeup, hairstyle, jewelry, accessories. I have to make sure they pose correctly and know how to show their outfit correctly, because it all depends on their look.

His talent captured the attention of the established style not only regionally but also internationally. Donatella Versace expressly requested to meet him in Dubai. “I’ve worked a lot with Versace in the Middle East, and once I got a call that Donatella Versace is in Dubai and would like to have dinner with you. We had one of the best dinners together, and that is a moment in my life that I will never forget. I have a great relationship with her and the brand.

The nature of Haddad’s work means he can never truly die out. Despite having a dedicated team in different countries, including Saudi Arabia, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, he is still the one who makes the final decision.

“It is very difficult because I am responsible for the image of the celebrity in its entirety. One mistake, and it’s on me, not her. With my team, I can delegate some things to save time, but eventually fame wants the main stylist, which is me, he says.

Add in tight deadlines, flamboyant tempers and last-minute bombshells and it’s obvious that Haddad is a high-pressure job. He recalls an incident from his MBC style days when a celebrity’s zipper malfunctioned.

“We had three minutes before it went live, and there was no save option. I took a thread and a needle and started sewing the zipper myself. I remember that my fingers were bleeding because I was trying to sew a metal zipper!

On another occasion, he contacted a pilot flying to Beirut from Paris to bring a dress for the finale of “The Voice Kids”.

“The entire Arab world was watching this episode! The dress was in Paris, and I told the pilot he had to bring it somehow. He actually hung it in the cockpit with him on the flight home,” he says.

While most of her work takes place behind the scenes, Abu Dhabi TV’s “Beauty Challenge” brought Haddad in front of the camera.

“I was working with some amazing talent and was able to help them get noticed. We have so many creative people in the Arab world, and they really need that little push to get out there and someone to guide them My co-host (Sarah Sofi) and I had such great chemistry, so it was a wonderful experience,” he says.

Currently, Haddad is busy working on another major milestone in his career – this year’s FIFA World Cup.

“They are producing three music videos for the official FIFA song, which will be released at the start of the tournament. I’m styling the celebrity who will open the music video,” he says, without revealing who it is.

As hectic as his demanding career has been, with multiple projects still in the works, Haddad is filled with gratitude.

“The happiest moment of your life is when you realize that your passion and your hobby have become your career,” he says. “You just wake up and enjoy every second.”

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Lebanese celebrate as dance troupe wins ‘America’s Got Talent’ https://handsofkali.com/lebanese-celebrate-as-dance-troupe-wins-americas-got-talent/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://handsofkali.com/lebanese-celebrate-as-dance-troupe-wins-americas-got-talent/ BEIRUT: News of a Lebanese dance group winning the “America’s Got Talent” television competition sparked joy across the country on Thursday. Mayyas, an all-female dance troupe, dazzled the show’s judges and audience in the competition’s 17th season before winning $1 million and a headlining show in Las Vegas. Lebanese President Michel Aoun called the team’s […]]]>

BEIRUT: News of a Lebanese dance group winning the “America’s Got Talent” television competition sparked joy across the country on Thursday.

Mayyas, an all-female dance troupe, dazzled the show’s judges and audience in the competition’s 17th season before winning $1 million and a headlining show in Las Vegas.

Lebanese President Michel Aoun called the team’s choreographer, Nadim Cherfan, who is still in the United States with his group, and congratulated him on the feat.

He informed him of his decision to award the team the Lebanese Order of Merit.

The dancers adopted the slogan “For You Lebanon” during the qualifying rounds, where he competed against 10 other contenders.

The excitement was felt on social media, which was inundated with congratulatory messages.

Twitter users hailed the achievement as a beacon of hope amid Lebanon’s crises, saying the group represents the country’s pride.

Diplomatic congratulations also poured in.

The EU mission in Lebanon said in a tweet that “Mayyas is a source of pride and inspiration”.

Saudi Ambassador to Lebanon Walid Bukhari tweeted: “The crew of the Mayyas who wowed the world showed us a picture of the Lebanon we love – a rare bird that will forever be the jewel of the Arab world.”

Although the Lebanese state did not cover the group’s travel expenses, which were ultimately paid for by the dancers’ families and accompanying members, politicians were also quick to congratulate the team.

Acting Prime Minister Najib Mikati said: “Lebanese creativity shines through this dazzling performance by the Mayyas group.

Former Prime Minister Fouad Siniora said the crew “was born out of the darkness and failure that Lebanon has witnessed due to its leadership, proving that Lebanon is full of talent and creativity and that he only has to follow the right path of fair competition based on competence, integrity and perseverance”.

The Lebanese Foreign Ministry said it shared the happiness of Lebanese expatriates residing in the United States, who voted and supported the team.

The Minister of Culture, Mohammed Wissam Mortada, also sent his congratulations, as did the Ministry of Tourism, as well as a number of MPs and business figures.

The Lebanese army command tweeted that the crew “carried the message of Lebanon – a bright and vibrant country – to the world”.

This success, achieved by a young Lebanese group, juxtaposes heavily with the country’s broader malaise caused by older politicians.

Their failure to find effective solutions to save Lebanon from its economic difficulties has been reflected in the ongoing discussions on the 2022 draft budget, the approval of which has been delayed for nine months.

Discussions in parliament began on Thursday and are expected to last two days.

Lebanon’s 2022 budget may not meet International Monetary Fund requirements for a rescue package, a member of Lebanon’s negotiating team told Reuters on Thursday.

Economy Minister Amin Salam said he feared the IMF could not be satisfied with the budget figures because it ignored the rights of depositors and employees and their security funds, other economic experts said.

He also ignored the recovery of stolen and smuggled money and the importance of pursuing criminal investigations into illicit enrichment cases.

The IMF said a staff mission will visit Lebanon to discuss ways to “accelerate” the implementation of the agreed reforms required for the lending program.

A financial expert said: “If the budget is approved by imposing additional taxes and fees before the recovery plan matures in a scientific and realistic way, it will overwhelm citizens following the lifting of subsidies on basic products and to the erosion of their salaries.

MP Ibrahim Kanaan, Chairman of the Finance and Budget Committee, argued during the budget discussion session that the budget lacked economic and social vision in a context of high unemployment, low growth rates and low capital expenditure allowances.

Kanaan pointed out that the scenarios established by the Ministry of Finance to fix the dollar exchange rates between 12,000 Lebanese pounds, 16,000 Lebanese pounds and 20,000 Lebanese pounds will not guarantee the necessary imports.

This creates an imbalance since imports are not enough to cover wages and contributions allocated to wages, social benefits and debt service, Kanaan added.

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Lebanese dance group Mayyas stuns judges on latest episode of ‘America’s Got Talent’ https://handsofkali.com/lebanese-dance-group-mayyas-stuns-judges-on-latest-episode-of-americas-got-talent/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 06:35:05 +0000 https://handsofkali.com/lebanese-dance-group-mayyas-stuns-judges-on-latest-episode-of-americas-got-talent/ DUBAI (Reuters) – British model Jourdan Dunn showed off glamorous arm candy from Dubai-based accessories brand L’Afshar at London Fashion Week on Saturday. The catwalk star was pictured wearing a chic blazer from clothing brand Nue, which she accessorized with L’Afshar’s YARA bag. Dunn opted for the bronze mirror colorway to complete her fashion week […]]]>

DUBAI (Reuters) – British model Jourdan Dunn showed off glamorous arm candy from Dubai-based accessories brand L’Afshar at London Fashion Week on Saturday.

The catwalk star was pictured wearing a chic blazer from clothing brand Nue, which she accessorized with L’Afshar’s YARA bag. Dunn opted for the bronze mirror colorway to complete her fashion week look.

Handmade in Dubai, the brand is known for its unique, structured designs and use of marbled resin and intricate mirrors. Lucite – known as acrylic glass – and birthstones also feature in the brand’s range of generally heavy straight-edged clutches in a range of light to saturated colors and textures.

The brand’s bags have been worn by several Hollywood celebrities, including Victoria’s Secret model Jasmine Tookes, actress Laura Dern, Kylie Jenner, Kendall Jenner and Rachel Bilson. However, these aren’t the only A-listers who seem to be big fans of the local brand – actress Jasmin Sanders, Bella Hadid, Kate Upton, Alicia Keys and Chrissy Teigen have all made public appearances with the arm candy of Afshar at your fingertips. .

Dunn seems to be on a Middle Eastern trend when it comes to her fashion choices – she was seen wearing a glamorous feathered dress by Lebanese designer Jean-Louis Sabaji at a launch party in London on September 4.

Dunn attended British Vogue editor Edward Enninful’s ‘A Visible Man’ book launch at London’s famed Claridge’s Hotel, among a star-studded guest list.

The model’s form-fitting all-black look is taken from Sabaji’s Spring ’21 ready-to-wear collection and features elaborate feather detailing at the neckline and down the sleeve length.

Beirut-based fashion designer Jean-Louis Sabaji is no stranger to celebrity endorsements and has dressed music industry stars in the past

From Cardi B and Beyonce to Brazilian singer Anitta, the designer’s creations have been spotted on many stages and red carpets.

Dunn completed her dress with a slicked back ponytail and dramatic, smoky eye makeup.

The model was on hand to celebrate the launch of Enninful’s book, which charts the journey of the first black person to be appointed editor-in-chief of British Vogue.

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Wahab Shah on the evolution of identity through dance https://handsofkali.com/wahab-shah-on-the-evolution-of-identity-through-dance/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 05:14:27 +0000 https://handsofkali.com/wahab-shah-on-the-evolution-of-identity-through-dance/ Renowned dancer, choreographer and teacher Wahab Shah has teamed up with fellow choreographer Bridget Fiske in a project about self-exploring dance and what the art form means to them. The project, aptly titled On Time: Kahanyan Dancecontains a 20-minute documentary titled Quote movement which encompasses the Kahanian dance journey. As the artists explore their deep […]]]>

Renowned dancer, choreographer and teacher Wahab Shah has teamed up with fellow choreographer Bridget Fiske in a project about self-exploring dance and what the art form means to them.

The project, aptly titled On Time: Kahanyan Dancecontains a 20-minute documentary titled Quote movement which encompasses the Kahanian dance journey. As the artists explore their deep connection to the embodied and conscious experiences of dance, Wahab and Bridget travel to Manchester and Karachi respectively. In these foreign cities, they are seen connecting with local dancers on the fringes as well as local dancers in the mainstream to learn about cultural preservation, as well as the universality that dance entails.

Sponsored by the British Arts Council, the project is launching its final season Pakistan/UK: New Perspectives which also includes two creative short films from the choreographers. Wahab’s short film, titled Ki Jaana Main Konsees eight youngsters from Thethar village, Lahore, as they perform a haunting routine on a Kalam by Sufi poet Bulleh Shah.

As Wahab spoke to The Express Grandstand in an email conversation, we got better insight into the project, Wahab’s evocative short, as well as the complexities of aspiring dancers trying to clean themselves up as drivers of today’s culture.

The routine in Wahab’s short film Ki Jaana Main Kon, based on the question of self and identity, was taught by Wahab and created from choreographic scores and materials generated by the travels and exchanges between Wahab and Bridget. Wahab outlines his process behind selecting Bulleh Shah Kalam and telling stories through dance, saying “It goes without saying that Baba Bulleh Shah asks this question, everyone asks the same question, and after 100 years today, even I am asking the same question. These kids I worked with Ki Jaana Main Kon, also ask the same question. So the tribute of storytelling through dance was a very natural process. It was all questions and answers. On the contrary, there was no answer, only a question.

Asked about the contribution of dance to the development of self, identity and community in a unique way, Wahab said, “So when we are born with a unique identity, we have a unique retina in our eye, we have a unique fingerprint, we have unique hair follicles, we have a unique voice box that we speak with and to top it off, when we are born we are all given a unique name to identify with. So inherently we are all born into this world as unique beings. And then, as we grow, we’re meant to adhere to the generic construct of society, and within those boxes of society, we also have to find our own unique way to contribute.

He continues, “What the dancer is doing is a dancer is actually looking at the universe and looking at the world they exist in and picking up a point as a unique way of explaining that concept to the world. And I think it’s only the unique identity that the dancer is born with and the idea that they have had that is important for the evolution of the human, or the evolution of the arts, or the evolution spirit. Because everything we live in and everything we live in today was thought up by a unique person in a unique way and now it’s part of our life, and we use it in a daily context.

During her years of choreographing for the local and global stage, Wahab addressed her historical perspective on the dance community in Pakistan, saying, “I think the dance community in Pakistan is misunderstood because of various factors. I may be completely off the mark, maybe a little controversial, but I have to say it. I think that if we achieved physical freedom in 1947, we remained the people of the subcontinent. We were never warmongers, we were artists and dancers. So when that line was drawn, we fell into our ego and decided that we had to form our own identity. However, we never created this new identity, we simply adopted the Middle Eastern identity to detach ourselves from our Hindustani identity. We were neither here nor there.

Wahab further stresses, “I think we will never fully develop until we along this line or border recognize our existing heritage. The good, the bad, the ugly is all us and we have to embrace it. The more we embrace it, the more beautiful and individual we will appear globally. Internationally, people have no interest if a dancer in Pakistan performs a second-grade Bollywood dance, or if they watch a bad hip-hop rendition of a dancer in Pakistan who tries so hard to copy someone another. I think if we change the context of self-understanding, we can still do hip-hop. But what is our local hip-hop? What is he influenced by? What are the reasons behind this?

“The dance forms that have emerged over time, whether American or Bollywood, we have simply copied them. Instead, we need to look within ourselves and discover the beautiful things we have. By perfecting our tools and our craft, we can create work that is true to ourselves, through which we will stand out as individuals on a global scale. That’s how I feel, that on a global scale, we’re still not understood. It’s because we haven’t really understood each other yet. So it starts within the country, within the borders, within the dance community and society to first accept yourself and really work on it. And then once you start working on it, the manifestations of it will have an echo, which will be global, concluded the choreographer.

Do you have something to add to the story? Share it in the comments below.

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Clorinda Agonistes review – a dance of love and death on the battlefield | Sadler’s Well https://handsofkali.com/clorinda-agonistes-review-a-dance-of-love-and-death-on-the-battlefield-sadlers-well/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 14:44:00 +0000 https://handsofkali.com/clorinda-agonistes-review-a-dance-of-love-and-death-on-the-battlefield-sadlers-well/ EEvery man kills what he loves, though rarely on the battlefield. Shobana Jeyasingh’s layered new dance work is inspired by a 16th century epic poem in which the Crusader Tancredi slays a valiant Saracen only to find it is Clorinda, the woman he loves. Monteverdi’s scene on this episode is a 20-minute wonder. First staged […]]]>

EEvery man kills what he loves, though rarely on the battlefield. Shobana Jeyasingh’s layered new dance work is inspired by a 16th century epic poem in which the Crusader Tancredi slays a valiant Saracen only to find it is Clorinda, the woman he loves.

Monteverdi’s scene on this episode is a 20-minute wonder. First staged in a Venetian palace in 1624, its driving rhythms represent a musical leap forward – pizzicato evokes metallic sword-strokes, swaying strings spitting sparks for the heat of battle. And Robert Hollingworth’s musicians are suitably bristling.

Soaring and dashing through Merle Hensel’s set of soaring glass pillars, Jemima Brown makes Clorinda unpredictable, while Jonathan Goddard’s Tancredi is almost whimsically accurate, fencing rather than slashing. These exceptional dancers create an electric charge – they jump, kick, roll until exhaustion. With a courteous flourish, Tancredi asks for Clorinda’s name; she holds him back, pushing an elbow on his sternum. Enraged, he deals the killing blow with a hug.

Who frames the story of Clorinde? In Monteverdi, a narrator takes the lion’s share, and Jeyasingh takes this further, with tenor Ed Lyon also singing the fighters’ lines. Fervent, tired, distressed, it expresses the changing atmospheres of the encounter. He crouches like a war reporter as the warriors struggle and swerve – but is Clorinde’s last-breathed ecstatic conversion to Christianity the story she would choose to tell?

Modern Crusade… the second part of Clorinda Agonistes, written by Kareem Roustom. Photograph: Tristram Kenton/The Guardian

In a less tense second section, composed by Syrian-American composer Kareem Roustom, four women become avatars of a present-day Clorinde, rushing at top speed to safety. Ruthless projections show a devastating and nameless conflict in the Middle East. The pillars, previously shrouded in Lee Curran’s rich emerald light, darken or fill with scarlet. This is how a crusade appears to those caught in it, less glamorous and chivalrous than in Monteverdi’s work.

A recorded mezzo sings in Arabic. Goddard and Lyon reappear as cameraman and sound operator, advancing dispassionately as the women whirl and fall. They too resist being known, their arms raised in their faces, their heads turned to one side. Line of unknowability, they advance in profile, advancing in emphatic leaps. The ropes slip, dazed with fatigue, but the women carry on. A fable about conversion now ends with the challenge.

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The danced journey of Maral Yessayan – The Armenian mirror-spectator https://handsofkali.com/the-danced-journey-of-maral-yessayan-the-armenian-mirror-spectator/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 20:37:12 +0000 https://handsofkali.com/the-danced-journey-of-maral-yessayan-the-armenian-mirror-spectator/ It was quite a challenge to find a scholastic writing on the Jordanian dabkah as a dance form. At the time, I was able to find ethnomusicological material on the musical traditions of Jordanian dances, but the existing material on the dance itself was small, superficial and sparse. I realized that to fully grasp Jordanian […]]]>

It was quite a challenge to find a scholastic writing on the Jordanian dabkah as a dance form. At the time, I was able to find ethnomusicological material on the musical traditions of Jordanian dances, but the existing material on the dance itself was small, superficial and sparse. I realized that to fully grasp Jordanian dances, my research had to be both ethnographic and “auto-ethnographic” in its method. So I traveled to the villages to see the dances in their rural form but also tapped into my own knowledge of dance in its stage form. I interviewed key personalities, government officials, Islamic clergy, culture keepers, elders, choreographers and dance practitioners. Jordan’s Minister of Culture, Jeryes Samawi (God rest his soul in peace), endorsed my research, provided me with new contacts, and facilitated the process of collecting data from the national archives. Without all these people, my thesis and my thesis would not have been possible. I am always indebted to them.

Dabke is believed to have its origins in ancient Phoenician dances. Lebanese Armenians also have a version of dabke which is sometimes played in Armenia.

Dabkah (Dabkeh, Dabke, etc.) is traditionally associated with the practices of folk or peasant communities residing in the region historically known as Greater Syria, which today includes Jordan, Syria, Lebanon, Iraq , the occupied Palestinian territories and Israel. It is not surprising that Lebanese Armenians adopted the form and brought it to Armenia. The adoption of the dances and their circulation in the world is not new or unique to this case. Historically, the dances have been adopted from one practicing community to another. In the process of transmitting a dance, its meanings also change. Thus, for Lebanese Armenians, the dabka takes on a whole new meaning. Through the movement, Lebanese Armenians are nostalgically celebrating their past and their connection to Lebanon, the land they left behind, and to having a sense of community on new soil in Armenia. At the same time, they delineate their difference from other Armenian settler communities as well as local Armenians. Dabkah immediately becomes a way for Lebanese Armenians in Armenia to mark their belonging and their separation.

In your dance performance “Here and There”, you examine intercultural dialogue through the art of improvisation. How is this dialogue possible?

“Here and There” is an attempt at East-West fusion approaches to dance making. Some researchers would call this “hybridity”, others would call it “the art of fusion”. Despite the nomenclature, the idea is to mix things up to create something new. My goal in creating this work was therefore to bring together different forms of movement that have different histories and geographically different origins and meanings and trace them through my body. Sometimes I moved distinctly between different dance genres, but mostly my interest was in blurring the lines between the forms. The intention was to show how our bodies are multilingual, multicultural and multifunctional, in an increasingly demanding and interconnected globalized world where we can be both “here” and “there”.

You have created your special choreographic tribute to the memory of the victims and survivors of the Armenian Genocide.

My performance “Hearing the Dead” is a tribute and commemoration to the countless victims and survivors of the genocide. I created this piece while residing in Los Angeles in 2007 to raise awareness about the Armenian Genocide. It is a multimedia performance that combines movement, speech and the screen. The piece explores the link between body memory and oral history and highlights the suffering of the body that “remembers”. One of the things I wanted to accomplish through this piece is the often unspoken and under-researched effects that the Armenian Genocide inflicted on its survivors. Grief, PTSD, anxiety and depression are all expressed and embodied forms of survival experienced and interpreted through this piece.

Maral Yessayan

Among the Armenian communities of the Middle East, that of Jordan seems less known. How was community life in Jordan and how is it now?

Growing up in the 1980s, most Armenians in Jordan were concentrated in the old part of the city of Amman. The Armenian community was vibrant and lively. The activities and social life of the Armenian community revolved around the Armenian Orthodox Church, the Yuzbashian Gulbenkian Armenian Orthodox School and the two Armenian Party Clubs (Tashnag and Ramgavar) – all of which were adjacent to each other. another on a hillside street in Ashrafiyyeh. In the 1990s, Silva Hairabedian championed Armenian theater and arts. She directed, produced and wrote a beautiful play in which I acted. In the 2010s, the cumulative effect of students studying abroad and the excessive number of families leaving Jordan thinned the Armenian community in Jordan. The small number of students and low funding with the added stress of the pandemic led to the unfortunate closure of the one and only Armenian school in 2020.

How did your family end up in Jordan?

My grandfather Iskandar was 3 years old in 1915 with a twin brother. His family lived in Dortyol, a town in present-day southern Turkey. When the plan to deport Ottoman Armenians was launched, they were forcibly aborted from their homes, deported to the desert, and driven further south on a march to face almost certain death. The men were separated from the women and children on these death marches – with the men in the lead and the women and children in the back. Weeks of walking have passed without water or food, just walking south through the Syrian desert.

My great-grandmother, Serpouhi, had an eight-month-old baby, three-year-old twins in her arms, a daughter and a six- and eight-year-old son between her skirts. She was hungry, thirsty and could no longer bear the weight of her three youngest children. She had to make a choice. In agony and tears, and arguably the most difficult decision of her life, she placed one of the twins under a shady rock and left him behind. It wasn’t my grandfather. Their story unfolds unexpectedly. My great-grandfather Tatios was an intelligent man who had just lost all his fortune, except one. He carried a carved wooden cane for support. The cane was not just any cane. It was filled with gold coins. When my great-grandfather Tatios learned what Serpouhi had done, he gave up all his coins to an Ottoman soldier in exchange for his horse and rode four hours north to find the child. Call it a miracle, Misag was intact and still alive. The twin brothers were united and the family survived to Jordan where the Bedouins provided them with safety, shelter and protection.

A touching story indeed! Maral, you now live in Arizona. Are there Middle Eastern or Armenian activities?

Unlike cities like Glendale, which holds the largest concentration of Armenians who make up a demographic majority of the city, the Armenian community in Arizona is relatively small and dispersed. There is St. Apkar Armenian Apostolic Church where we performed my daughter’s consecration service. The church is the main institution that serves ethnic Armenian families to preserve the language, culture and traditions. I see a lot of potential for growth and solidarity for the Armenian community in post-pandemic Arizona.

Here in Arizona, my priority has been my family. I raised my daughter who goes to ballet school and has a lot of me in her. I exercise and practice yoga and continue to cultivate my body to a higher physical level.

After a long sabbatical and now that my daughter is older, I’m considering getting more involved in the Phoenix art scene, or maybe even traveling as a guest speaker, or branching out into acting. I haven’t started a new project yet but the sky is the limit as they say, so wish me luck!

Good luck Maral! And welcome back to Armenia!

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Weekend Art Events in San Diego: “Ragtime,” Dance, Jazz, and How-to Books https://handsofkali.com/weekend-art-events-in-san-diego-ragtime-dance-jazz-and-how-to-books/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 18:06:00 +0000 https://handsofkali.com/weekend-art-events-in-san-diego-ragtime-dance-jazz-and-how-to-books/ The Rosin Box Project: “Beginnings” dance musicThe concert features four new contemporary ballet works – two by guest choreographers Katarzyna Skarpetowska and Myles Thatcher and two by Rosin Box Project resident choreographers Katie Spagnolletti and Jeremy Zapanta. I have seen pieces of some of these works; they are powerful, expressive and beautiful. Here is a […]]]>

The Rosin Box Project: “Beginnings”

dance music
The concert features four new contemporary ballet works – two by guest choreographers Katarzyna Skarpetowska and Myles Thatcher and two by Rosin Box Project resident choreographers Katie Spagnolletti and Jeremy Zapanta. I have seen pieces of some of these works; they are powerful, expressive and beautiful. Here is a clip on Instagram of Zapanta’s work, including an excerpt from an original score by San Diego composer and musician Zane Alexander.

It’s the finale of their current season, and there are four chances to see it – plus a virtual option.

Details: 7:30 p.m. from Thursday to Sunday, from September 1 to 4, 2022. Virtual broadcast at 7:00 p.m. on September 3. Mingei International Museum, La Atalaya Foundation Theatre, 1439 El Prado, Balboa Park. $40-$45 for live performance, $25 for virtual performance.

May-ling Martinez: “Bright Emergence”

visual art
This weekend feels like the calm before the (visual arts) storm that is about to hit the region in September (San Diego Art Prize! Alexis Smith at MCASD! Design Week! And more!). But there’s still plenty of artwork to check out right now, including new works by Puerto Rican-born, San Diego-based artist May-ling Martinez, currently on display at Quint ONE, their Bread location. and Salt in Logan Heights.

Courtesy of Quint Gallery

Close-up of “Luminous Emergence” by May-Ling Martinez, which is on view at Quint ONE in Logan Heights through September 11, 2022.

“Luminous Emergence” is a unique multimedia work installed in the tiny gallery. It’s a projection screen suspended in space, dotted with a group of illustrations that fall somewhere between petroglyphs and borrowed medical textbooks or illustrations from survival/how-to manuals – complicated knots alongside crystal-like objects and vague suggestions of fantastical organs and sinewy muscles, tendons and veins. It’s easy to get a little lost in the details of this deceptively unassuming piece.

Details: On view through September 11, 2022. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., 1955 Julian Ave., Logan Heights. Free.

‘Ragtime’ at the Moonlight Amphitheater

Theater
The beloved and award-winning musical “Ragtime” – based on the 1975 novel EL Doctorow – follows three individuals living very different lives in early 20th century America. Coalhouse Walker Jr. is a black musician from Harlem, “Mother” is an upper-class housewife from Westchester, and Tateh is a Jewish immigrant. The soundtrack is, of course, full of songs tinged with ragtime and jazz, as well as klezmer and contemporary styles.

Outdoor production of Moonlight closes this weekend, so this is your last chance. It is directed by John Vaughan and stars Bets Malone as Mother, Charl Brown as Coalhouse and Geno Carr as Tateh, alongside a large cast and orchestra. Note that “Ragtime” includes foul language, including racial slurs.

Details: On stage until September 3, 2022. Remaining performances are at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, September 1-3, 2022. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. The Moonlight, 1250 Vale Terrace Dr., Vista. $8 to $61.

‘Fandango for Butterflies (and Coyotes)’ at La Jolla Playhouse

Theater
It is a production of the New York theater company En Garde Arts presented at La Jolla Playhouse.

FANDANGO-1.jpg

Actors and musicians from the La Jolla Playhouse and En Garde Arts production of ‘Fandango for Butterflies (and Coyotes)’, in an undated photo.

The new play, written by playwright Andrea Thome with music composed by Sinuhé Padilla, is set in a communal “fandango”. The term signifies a specific dance, but it is also a joyous gathering and celebration with storytelling, music, and dance that is common to Latin American immigrant communities. In the play, this particular fandango takes place just before Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) raids take over the city.

Details: On stage until September 25, 2022. Performances this weekend will be at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday September 1-4 and 7 p.m. Sunday, September 4, 2022. La Jolla Playhouse, 2910 La Jolla Village Dr ., UC San Diego. $25 to $60.

Jazz at the Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis

Music, Jazz, Outdoor concerts
This group of 15 world-renowned jazz instrumentalists is Lincoln Center’s resident jazz ensemble in New York City and is led by jazz trumpeter Wynton Marsalis. At a JLCO show, expect a wide range of jazz works, from classics to new works by orchestra members. This performance at Shell doesn’t include the San Diego Symphony Orchestra, but it does include a special pre-show ensemble from the Young Lions Jazz Conservatory, so arrive before 6:15 p.m. to check out some great upcoming San Diego talent.

DetailsSunday, September 4, 2022. Rady Shell at Jacobs Park, 222 Marina Park Way, Downtown. $50 to $110.

Visionary Dance Theatre: ‘Cradle’

Dance
Throughout the summer, Mojalet Dance Collective (“Mojalet” is a portmanteau of modern, jazz and ballet dance styles) invited dance companies from across the county to present work, as well as share some of the their.

To conclude this summer series, the Visionary Dance Theater presents three performances of the work “Cradle” by choreographer Tanya Lewis. The piece blends Western dance styles with traditional Middle Eastern dance, reflecting Lewis’ background and upbringing.

DetailsSaturday, Sept. 3: 7 p.m.; 2 and 4:30 p.m. Sunday, September 4, 2022. Vine Arts Village Theatre, 12540 Oaks North Dr., Rancho Bernardo. $16 to $21.

For more arts events and editor’s picks, to submit your own event, or to sign up for the weekly KPBS/Arts newsletter, visit the KPBS/Arts Calendar.

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Austrian contemporary dance show Hydráos to be presented at the National Theater – Music and dance – Al-Ahram Weekly https://handsofkali.com/austrian-contemporary-dance-show-hydraos-to-be-presented-at-the-national-theater-music-and-dance-al-ahram-weekly/ Tue, 30 Aug 2022 19:16:33 +0000 https://handsofkali.com/austrian-contemporary-dance-show-hydraos-to-be-presented-at-the-national-theater-music-and-dance-al-ahram-weekly/ Beit Al SeheimiAl-Muaaz St, Al-Darb Al-Asfar Alley, Al-Gamalya District, Tel 02 2787 8865Every Sunday, 7 p.m.: La Troupe du Nil for folk instruments, conducted by Abdel-Rahman Al-Shafaaiperforms Upper Egyptian dances and songs on mizmar, tabla and other traditional musical instruments.Every Friday at 7 p.m.: “Al-Aragouz wa Khayal Al-Zel” (The Shadow Puppet), free public clown show […]]]>

Beit Al Seheimi
Al-Muaaz St, Al-Darb Al-Asfar Alley, Al-Gamalya District, Tel 02 2787 8865
Every Sunday, 7 p.m.: La Troupe du Nil for folk instruments, conducted by Abdel-Rahman Al-Shafaaiperforms Upper Egyptian dances and songs on mizmar, tabla and other traditional musical instruments.
Every Friday at 7 p.m.: “Al-Aragouz wa Khayal Al-Zel” (The Shadow Puppet), free public clown show in Al-Muaaz Street, presented by Wamda and led by Nabil Bahgat.

Cairo Opera House

Gezira Exhibition Center, Tel 02 2737 0602/2736 0361, ticket office 02 2739 0132/0144

main hall

Fri 2, 8 p.m.: The Talent Development Center concert.

Sat 15, 8 p.m.: The Cairo Symphony Orchestra.

small room

Fri 2, 8 p.m.: Harp recital by Yasmine ElHarby.

Thursday 8, 8 p.m.: Racha Yehia and his band.

open air theater

Fri 9, 8 p.m.: Percussionist Nesma Abdel Aziz plays the marimba, accompanied by his orchestra.

Al-Ghouri Caravanserai
Mohamed Abdou Street, near Al-Muaaz and Al-Azhar streets, tel. 02 2514 7475
Al Tanoura whirling dervishes perform for a living sufi music
(Performances every Saturday and Wednesday at 7:30 p.m.).

Al-Gumhouriya Theater

12 Al-Gumhouriya St., Abdin, tel. 02 2390 7707

Fri 9, 8 p.m.: The National Arabic music together in a repertoire of classic Arabic songs.

Makan

1 Saad Zaghloul St, Al-Mounira, Cairo, Tel 2792 0878

Every Tuesday, 9-10 p.m.: Mawawil presents singers Hend and Sarah in a repertoire of traditional music from the Nile delta, Al Jaafra music played by the Arab tribes of Aswan and Nass Makan bandaged.

Every Wednesday from 9 p.m. to 10 p.m.: zar music and songs by Mazaher together with Umm Sameh, Umm Hassan and Nour Al-Sabah.

Rawabet Art Space

3, rue Hussien El Meaamar ext. from Mahmoud Basiouny Street, Talaat Harb Square, Downtown

Fri 2 p.m., 7 p.m.: Live interactive comedy show from Omar El Gamal.

Sat 15, 8 p.m.: Consecutive musical performances by Ahmad Mustafa xpress and Mohammad Bonga. Start the evening with Ahmed X’s set, an experimental fusion of electronics and shaaby music inspired by the authentic sounds of the city. After Ahmed X, Bonga will express his journey through the genres of trip-hop, hip-hop and electronic music. End the evening in style, as the two musicians perform together for a final joint session.

Al-Qawmi Theater (the national theater)

Al Attaba Square, in front of Attab Post Office, Cairo, Tel, 02 25917783

Fri 2 and Sat 3, 7-8.30 p.m. (Free entrance): hammered rhythms, atmospheric piano compositions and expressive combinations – the Austrian contemporary dance performance ‘Hydráos’ takes us into a fantastic blue-green underwater world with its extraterrestrial water creatures.

They are alive. They breathe. There is moving. Deafened by water. Are they animals? Plants? Or are they human beings? Three dancers in tight-fitting full bodysuits crawl, roll, stand and wiggle across the stage. The avant-garde performance of the Austrian Editta Braun company is a lyrical fantasy about the history of evolution and illustrates the closeness of human beings to nature. This performance cannot be described in words, it can only be experienced. The show is presented on the occasion of the 29th edition of the Cairo International Festival of Experimental Theater (CIFET). Choreography, Artistic Direction, Stage: Editta Braun, Dance, Research: Martyna Lorenc, Sonia Borkowicz, Rosana RibeiroMembership by Thierry ZaboitzeffLightweight design by Thomas Hinterbergand
Dramaturgy by Gerda Poschmann-Reichenau.

Room Art Space & Café
10 Etihad Al Mohamin, Garden City, Tel. 01000 068 159

Thursday 1, 9 p.m.: Amr Gahin and Amira Reda in a concert that includes oriental rhythms mixed with western rhythms like Reggae and Funk.

Fri 2 p.m., 9 p.m.: Best of Arabic cover covers, both contemporary and classic, performed by the singer Reem Ezzeldin.

Sat 3 p.m., 9 p.m.: Egyptian singer and composer Mosad Ozil performs its own original songs and some traditional Arabic songs with very unique and different musical arrangements.

Thursday 8, 9 p.m.: DarQubeis an Egyptian music group that pays tribute to the famous group imagine Dragons with their own musical style. Group members: miram hossam -Vocal, Akram Ali -Piano
Row Magdy – Bass guitar, Weam Hossam – Main guitar, Ahmed Elgharib – Acoustic guitar, and Mohammad Moksh – Drums.

The Spot Mall, in front of AUC Gate 4, New Cairo

Sat 3, 9 p.m.: Sticks stand-up comedy show.

Sun 4, 9 p.m.: The monthly Open mic night.

Monday 5, 9 p.m.: Rising Egyptian pop-star Yasser Ayoub will be on stage with Egyptian pop music with his breathtaking voice.

Tue 6, 9 p.m.: Rap night featuring upcoming artists from mcm records.

El-Sawy Culture Wheel
End of July 26th Street, under May 15th Bridge, Zamalek, Tel 02 2736 8881/6178/2737 4448

(No entry without a mask and the room will be open at only 25% audience capacity)

River Room

Thursday 1st, 7 p.m.: Sufi songs and dances by El Mawlawiya El Masria troupe, led by a Sufi singer Amer El-Tony.

Fri 2, 7:30 p.m.: Fouad and Mounib concert.

Sun 4, 8 p.m.: Neveen Allouba Concert of the Vocal Academy.

Wed 7, 8 p.m.: Naghamat group, led by the artist Rushdy Badawy.

Thursday 8 p.m., 7 p.m.: A reggae concert by Meshwar X Usif.

hall of wisdom

Game 1, 6 p.m. and 8 p.m.: El-Sawy Culturewheel Puppet Theater The show brings to life the concerts of Umm Kolthoum performing two of her most beloved songs: Fakarony (remind me) and Ya Msharny (oh you wake me up).

Fri 2, 8 p.m.: A concert by Neveen Allouba Vocal Academy.

Zamalek Theater

Armed Forces Officers Club, Zamalek, tel. 01101153105

Thursday 1, 8 p.m.: Jordanian singer, songwriter and composer Aziz Maraka will perform his hits including Mafi Menik (no one is like you), Bethlawi (you become more beautiful), and Meen Gallek (who told you).
Fri 2, 8 p.m.: Amr Hassan in another poetic-musical concert.

ALEXANDRIA

Alexandria Opera (Sayed Darwish Theatre)

Fouad Street, Mahatat Al-Raml, Alexandria, Tel 03/486 5106

Thursday 8, 8 p.m.: Alexandria Opera Company for Arabic music and singing.


*A version of this article appeared in the September 1, 2022 edition of Al-Ahram Weekly.

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Get moving in these 7 unique dance classes in Birmingham https://handsofkali.com/get-moving-in-these-7-unique-dance-classes-in-birmingham/ Sun, 28 Aug 2022 17:18:06 +0000 https://handsofkali.com/get-moving-in-these-7-unique-dance-classes-in-birmingham/ Birmingham has so many unique dance classes to try. (WYRD Art Group) Looking to start a new hobby or perhaps rekindle a past passion for dancing? We’ve rounded up some unique dance classes in Birmingham for you to get away from it all. Keep reading to get the details. 1. Bellydance beginner You’ll be dancing […]]]>
Birmingham has so many unique dance classes to try. (WYRD Art Group)

Looking to start a new hobby or perhaps rekindle a past passion for dancing? We’ve rounded up some unique dance classes in Birmingham for you to get away from it all. Keep reading to get the details.

1. Bellydance beginner

Image 54 Get moving in these 7 unique dance classes in Birmingham
You’ll be dancing inside, don’t worry! (WYRD Studio)

Raise your elbows to the sun and learn to belly dance with Ash. This low impact dance is guaranteed to boost your confidence while helping you tone your muscles. Interested? All you need are soft ballet flats or your bare feet and a bodysuit! Those 12 years and older can enroll in these dance classes, but those under 18 must be registered by an adult.

2. PYT Dance Pole

Get moving in these 7 unique dance classes in Birmingham
Are you ready? (Studio PYT/Instagram)

If you’re looking for a way to have fun while exercising, check out PYT. This pole dance studio was founded by Niya Jackson in 2009. Last week I took an introductory class that lasted an hour and I promise you it was worth it. You’re usually paired with someone who helps you master the moves so you don’t look like a mess.

3. Pole Dancing | Steel studio

Whether you want to take a group lesson or a private lesson, Studio Steel offers pole dancing lessons for Birmingham residents interested in learning. If you are 18 or older, you can enroll in one of the courses offered. Dance and drink lots of water.

PS—they are moving to a new location soon. Check it out below.

4. Adult Faucet | The Dance Foundation

For all that jazz, sign up for an adult tap class with The Dance Foundation in Birmingham. You will appreciate that they offer beginner and intermediate classes. They also offer dance lessons, including adult ballet if that’s more your style.

5. Pilates | Aero Joe

dance classes
Located at Pepper Place. (Bham now)

As for unique dance classes, Aero Joe offers pilates, a form of dance that focuses on stretching the body through deep muscle and body movement. It is a remarkable exercise of the whole person. In other words, at Aero Joe, you can relieve postural imbalances, improve flexibility, and boost your overall mood.

6. Bantaba Dance | Dance of Ursula Smith

To learn more about West African dance, try taking a class with Ursula Smith Dance. Discover the different dance styles of sub-Saharan Africa right here in Birmingham. It’s liberating and fun!

7. Aziza from Birmingham

When it comes to belly dancing lessons in Birmingham, the choice is yours! Aziza has taught and taught Classical Egyptian Middle Eastern Belly Dancing for over 40 years in this field. She even traveled to Cairo, Egypt to compete in the region’s first non-Egyptian Bellydance competition.

Do you have a unique dance class in Birmingham that you like to go to? Tag us @BhamNow to let us know.

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Mickey Mouse Launches New Craze, Hundreds of Disney Adults Are Dancing Across Theme Parks https://handsofkali.com/mickey-mouse-launches-new-craze-hundreds-of-disney-adults-are-dancing-across-theme-parks/ Sun, 14 Aug 2022 17:10:45 +0000 https://handsofkali.com/mickey-mouse-launches-new-craze-hundreds-of-disney-adults-are-dancing-across-theme-parks/ There’s a new dance craze at Disney Parks – and it all started with a Mickey Mouse. Credit: Disney At the Tokyo Disney Resort, Tokyo Disneyland and Tokyo DisneySea theme parks, hundreds of ‘Disney Adults’ were spotted dancing shamelessly to an addictive song and dance called ‘Jamboree Mickey’ – led by the mouse himself . […]]]>

There’s a new dance craze at Disney Parks – and it all started with a Mickey Mouse.

Credit: Disney

At the Tokyo Disney Resort, Tokyo Disneyland and Tokyo DisneySea theme parks, hundreds of ‘Disney Adults’ were spotted dancing shamelessly to an addictive song and dance called ‘Jamboree Mickey’ – led by the mouse himself .

Jamboree Mickey Banner, Minnie Mouse (left) and Mickey Mouse (right)
Credit: Disney

Related: Disney Park Proves Half Visitors Can Still Make Billions, Full Capacity May Never Return

Now it seems like everyday, outside and around the Mickey Jamboree! Let’s Dance!’s Dockside Stage at Tokyo DisneySea’s American waterfront port of call, swarms of “Disney Adults” in the hundreds gather to dance in unison for 15 minutes straight, with two energetic members of the cast, Mickey Mouse, Minnie Mouse, Donald Duck and friends.

Twitter user @vBZmqCzYqTu7JUM shares the following video:

(automatic translation) I’ve heard rumors, but this festival is irresistible 🤟✨
#TDR_now

This is actually a video of the infamous “Jamboree Mickey” phenomenon that happens almost daily at Tokyo Disney Resort now.

What is Jamboree Mickey and why do adults dance?

Jamboree Mickey actually arrived at Tokyo Disney Resort as a theme park children’s entertainment program in 2019. Currently, it is performed 3-5 times a day on live stages at Tokyo Disneyland (Orleans Theater) and at Tokyo DisneySea (Dockside Stage), after a hiatus due to COVID-19. The catchy tune features a remix of the iconic Mickey Mouse Club theme song and began on the parade route, a “street party” similar to those found in Walt Disney World’s Magic Kingdom.

In its debut, the song and dance was even performed on Japanese national television, in collaboration with the popular Japanese pop girl group Nogizaka46, where they danced alongside small children, as well as Mickey and his friends from the Disney parks:

However, the infectious quality of the song and dance has, over time, sunk into the public consciousness, and many “Disney Adults” have begun showing up at Tokyo Disney Resort’s live shows – perhaps be for two main reasons:

The first reason could be attributed to the COVID-19 pandemic which has triggered an increase in health-oriented activities in Japanese schools, especially in preschools and kindergartens. The Walt Disney Company had started sending “Jamboree Mickey!” video schools, encouraging children to learn dance. Over time, it seems that the repetitive song and dance has successfully spread to parents and older generations.

The second reason could have been that adorably excitable Pinocchio who went viral after being spotted at Tokyo Disneyland, dancing excitedly on Jamboree Mickey! around the park and comically engaging park visitors:

After the Mickey Jamboree! returned in April 2022 after a hiatus, again due to COVID-19, the show had begun to attract a steady number of dancing guests in the cordoned off areas beyond the seats provided, several dedicated souls – all of whom knew the choreography by heart:

Related: “Fantastic!” Replacement debuts in November as Disney reveals details of new show

Today, the “Disney Adult” phenomenon of Tokyo Disney Resort’s daily show is known to locals as “Adult Jamboree Mickey” (the title of the following video), and regularly hosts overflowing crowds of people who all have learned and prepared for the dance ahead of their big day at the Disney Parks, even spreading behind the buildings in the alleys of the Land:

All in all, it really looks like the craze isn’t about to let up – instead, it’s getting bigger and more prolific by the day. The simple and catchy Mickey-themed song and dance dig into people’s brains, which transformed the Mickey Jamboree into watching! at Tokyo Disney Resort into a truly unique experience.

What do you think of this new craze for Mickey Mouse dancing? Would you dance this if you could? Share your opinion in the comments below!

Unlike other fully owned Walt Disney Company parks like Walt Disney World Resort and Disneyland Resort, Tokyo Disney Resort located in Urayasu, Chiba, Japan exists as the Walt Disney Company’s very first international Disney Park and is owned and operated by the Oriental Land Company. Located right next to JR Maihama Station, Tokyo Disney Resort includes two theme parks – Tokyo Disneyland and Tokyo DisneySea, connected by the Disney Resort Line monorail. The other two Disney parks in Asia are Hong Kong Disney Resort and Shanghai Disney Resort.

Tokyo Disneyland is a short distance from the Tokyo Disneyland Hotel and Toy Story Hotel, and features a castle similar to Walt Disney World’s Magic Kingdom, complete with its own Cinderella Castle. Tokyo Disneyland offers more than one unique attraction, including the Tokyo-exclusive Winnie the Pooh Trackless Ride, Pooh’s Honey Hunt, as well as Monsters, Inc.’s “Ride & Go Seek!”. Familiar favorites from other parks include Space Mountain, Splash Mountain, Haunted Mansion, Star Tours: The Adventures Continue, It’s a Small World, and Buzz Lightyear’s Astro Blaster.

Tokyo DisneySea is a truly unique Disney Park themed by the Society of Explorers and Adventurers (SEA), it features seven themed lands, or “ports of call” – the Mediterranean Seaport, the American Seafront, the Delta of the lost river, the discovery of Port, the lagoon of the mermaid, Coast of Arabia and mysterious island. Equally unique are DisneySea’s unique and exclusive attractions – Soaring: Fantastic Flight, Indiana Jones Adventure: Temple of the Crystal Skull, the SEA storyline old New York-style hotel Tower of Terror: Hotel Hightower, Jules Verne -inspired by 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, and the star attraction Journey to the Center of the Earth, located in the park’s looming icon – the giant volcano Mount Prometheus. Most unique of all is the official Disney hotel on the property (which basically redefines “on the property”) – the luxurious MiraCosta Hotel, built directly into the buildings of Tokyo DisneySea’s Mediterranean harbor itself.

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